Brooklyn Deep Third Rail

Third Rail Eps 43: Blewish: The easy myths and hard truths of Black-Jewish relations.

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Crown Heights is America’s most infamous Black-Orthodox Jewish conflict zone. Mark and Veralyn explore the intersections of these identities with Chava Shervington, a Black orthodox woman who spent 5 years in Crown Heights, but now lives in California. Joining us remotely, Chava reflects on dueling narratives of Black anti-semitism and Jewish racism.

Segment One: We ride along Chava’s personal journey and public life while gaining insight into Jewish participation in whiteness.

Segment Two: We discuss the “othering” of each other’s communities by Blacks and Jews and consider their common interests.

Segment Three: "Tell 'Em Why You Mad"

Intro and Outro theme Music:

“City Survival” by MC K-Swift featuring TreZure Empire.

Episode Music: Holy Roller (instrumental) by YACHT.

 

Third Rail Eps 39: By Any Means Necessary?

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Mark and Veralyn sit down with Alicia Boyd, the fiery founder of Movement to Protect the People, and pose the question: Are there limits to what an activist should be willing to do in the fight for social justice? Also informing the discussion is an interview with Daniel Goldstein, who looks back on his controversial refusal to leave his home when developers wanted to tear it down to build the Barclays arena and the surrounding high rises. 
 
Segment One: Alicia Boyd and the art of anti-respectibility politics.
Mark and Veralyn interview Alicia Boyd about what it’s like to be known as a grenade thrower among her neighbors as she takes on development and what she describes as community board corruption.
 
Segment Two: Daniel Goldstein and the solitude of disruption.
Mark interviews Daniel Goldstein, the public face of Develop Don’t Destroy, which took on the Mayor, Bertha Lewis, and one of city’s biggest developers in a campaign to stop the building of the Barclays arena. Veralyn, Alicia and Mark then discuss what it takes to be a force of one.

Segment Three: "Tell 'Em Why You Mad"                            

Veralyn and Alicia talk through the mixed feelings of the recent Women's March.

Intro and Outro theme Music:

“City Survival” by MC K-Swift featuring TreZure Empire.

Episode Music:

"Coronea", "Basurera", & "Stipple" by Blue Dot Sessions.

TR Express: In moments like these

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We've been here before. Trying to process how easily black people die at the hands of police; how easily hashtags pile up: #DelrawnSmall #AltonSterling #PhilandoCastile; and needing to find a way forward through it all.

Third Rail pauses to check-in with Anthonine Pierre (Brooklyn Movement Center's Lead Community Organizer) and Ryann Holmes (Bklyn Boihood Co-founder) about the impact of this moment (which includes five Dallas officers being killed) and how Central Brooklyn moves forward.

If you need a community base or resource for an initiative you are taking on, contact the Brooklyn Movement Center at bmc@brooklynmovementcenter.org or Bklyn Boihood here.

TR 33: Relevance of Race in Central Brooklyn

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This month two oral historians, Amaka Okechukwu (Weeksville Heritage Center) and Zaheer Ali (Brooklyn Historical Society), come on to tackle the relevance of race in Central Brooklyn. First by examining the impact of the Crown Heights "Riots." Then we ask, are there dimensions that get missed by identifying Central Brooklyn neighborhoods, as black?

Segment one: Crown Heights 1991: Does the past matter?
As we gear up to commemorate the 25th Anniversary of the Crown Heights “riots," we discuss the neighborhood conditions that lead to what happened in 1991, and the impact those events still have on Central Brooklyn residents today.

Segment two: Do we miss something by calling Central Brooklyn, Black Brooklyn?
We use "black" to describe Central Brooklyn, but is there something overly reductive happening when we do this? Are we missing the rich dimensions of the way people really truly identify themselves, interact with each other, and identify their neighborhood?

Segment 3: "Tell 'Em Why You Mad" Roundup

Third Rail Eps 31: The Case for Hyper Local News

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On this episode, we unpack the role local news plays in neighborhoods like Bed-Stuy and Crown Heights and how outlets reporting in Central Brooklyn are cover gentrification.

Guest: Jarrett Murphy, Executive Editor & Publisher, City Limits

Segment 1: What role does hyperlocal news play in communities like Crown Heights and Bed-Stuy?
As much of what we knew of as metro reporting by legacy news outlets has faded in prominence over the last 10 years-- we want to know what role does hyperlocal news play in communities like Crown Heights and Bed-Stuy?

Segment 2: Reporting on the G word
It’s almost impossible to discuss hyper-local happenings without mentioning gentrification. But how is it currently being framed in mainstream media?


Segment 3: "Tell 'Em Why You Mad" 
Roundup

Third Rail Eps 30: What is the legacy of resilience in Central Brooklyn?

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On this episode we examine the legacy of resilience in Central Brooklyn by reflecting on the history of organizing and movement building here and then by asking what is the present state of the Movement for Black Lives here in Central Brooklyn, New York and nationwide.

Joining us for this discussion are two organizers who have played an important role in shaping the legacy of social and political self-determination that Black Brooklyn is known for today:

Lumumba Bandele, Senior Community Organizer, NAACP Legal Defense Fund

Ejeris Dixon, Founding Director, Vision Change Win


Segment 1: Histories Resilience in Central Brooklyn

While the fight for social change in Central Brooklyn has been city-wide and even national, it has often been anchored by what’s happening locally. We sit down with two organizers who have played a special role in shaping the legacy of social and political self-determination that Black Brooklyn is known for today.

Segment 2: How does Central Brooklyn connect to this movement moment?

In this present “movement moment” we ask: How has the legacy of Central Brooklyn organizing laid the groundwork for #BlackLivesMatter movements in Central Brooklyn, New York and nationwide?

Segment 3: "Tell 'Em Why You Mad" Roundup

Third Rail Eps 25: The life and times of Brooklyn neighborhoods

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Assemblymember Diana Richardson and community advocate Marlon Peterson join us on Third Rail to look at the people and identities, influencing and claiming Central Brooklyn. We start by asking are elected officials and community organizers are on the same side of community development? Then we ask what neighborhood change means to immigrant communities?

Guests:

Assemblymember Diana Richardson, 43rd Assembly District
Marlon Petersons, Community Advocate & 2015 Soros Justice Fellow

Segments:

1. Are elected officials and community organizers on the same side of community development?

Economic development in Bed-Stuy and Crown Heights is an issue that calls to mind small business owners, big developers, and displaced longtime residents. On this episode, we’re exploring what perspectives elected officials and community organizers hold on the topic.

2. What does neighborhood change mean to immigrant communities?

Crown Heights has been built, over the last half century, as a largely Caribbean immigrant community. As we know, gentrification has taken hold as a different force of neighborhood change. We ask, what does gentrification look like from the perspective of first and second generation immigrants?

3. "Tell em why you mad" Roundup

Third Rail Eps 20: Crown Heights Fight

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On "Crown Heights Fight" we report on the state of tenant organizing in Central Brooklyn and how tenants are reacting to rising rents. We then put to the test the notion that Bed-Stuy gets more political and media love than Crown Heights.

Guests:

zakia henderson-brown, Board Member, Brooklyn Movement Center
Joel Feingold, Member, Crown Heights Tenants Union

Segments: 

1. How are tenants fighting gentrification in Central Brooklyn?We talk a LOT about gentrification on this show. In Central Brooklyn, it feels like an overwhelming force that touches every aspect of life. Ultimately, though, gentrification boils down to the struggle around tenant displacement and rent overages. So, beyond talking about it, what are tenants doing on the housing front to stop gentrification?

2. Is Crown Heights Bed-Stuy's stepchild?Crown Heights and Bedford-Stuyvesant are both vibrant, internationally known neighborhoods in their own right. We're exploring what it means for a neighborhood to be popular and we're trying to figure out -- is Bed-Stuy more popular than Crown Heights or is it the other way around?

3. "Tell em why you mad" Roundup

Third Rail Eps 11: Street Talk

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Guest Hosts: 

Amaka Okechukwu, a member of BMC's collective, No Disrespect
Ruby-Beth Buitekant, a Crown Heights based youth organizer

Segments: 

1. ish- people-say-to-me: It's summer! Which means free concerts, trips to Coney Summer means street harassment season round these parts, and we are smack dab in the middle of it. What are the most outrageous things that have been said or done to you in the street, and what are some ways to react?
Media: ishpeoplesaytome.tumblr.com

2. The Block is Hot: It's one year after NYC social justice organizations got a huge success in the form of two City Council bills aimed at reforming aggressive policing policies. Has a difference in citywide policy translated to change at the precinct level? How's it goin' down in Central Brooklyn?

3. "Tell em why you mad" Roundup

Third Rail Eps 10: Brooklyn Summer

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Guest Hosts: 

James Subudhi, BMC Board Member, Neighborhood Activist
Britney Whaley, Political Organizer, Working Families Party

Segments: 

1. 2014 Races & Elected Accountability: It's summer! Which means free concerts, trips to Coney Island and... campaign season! What are the big races we should be paying attention to in Central Brooklyn? And how can we hold elected officials accountable after they get into office?
Media: Jockeying to Fill Open Legislative Seats Beginning in Brooklyn

2. Open Hydrants & Double-Dutch: There's something about June, July and August in Brooklyn that evokes freedom, youth, and tons of gatherings of Black & brown folk. We'll try to pinpoint that "je ne sais quoi" about Brooklyn summers that makes them so darn good.

3. "Tell em why you mad" Roundup