Brooklyn Deep Third Rail

EP 32: Centering the Margins: Black Women, Black Girls, Black Youth

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This month, Third Rail evaluates the state of black leadership in Central Brooklyn with Joanne Smith (Girls for Gender Equity) and Nakisha Lewis (The Ms. Foundation for Women). We discuss the different ways Black women and girls are claiming space in our current movement moment and then we ask, what's being done to build youth leadership?

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Third Rail Eps 14: Revolutionary Birth

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Guest Hosts: 

Rae Gomes, Mother, Writer, & Activist
Shatia Strother, Community Organizer, FUREE

Segments: 

1. Motherhood, Womanhood & Movements: For women, deciding to be an activist means fighting a struggle for women's voices to be heard. Sometimes it means deciding to raise children in social justice communities. Sometimes it means being a mentor and surrogate mother to young people in the movement. Often times, it means all of the above. But how does this reality play out for women in Central Brooklyn today?

2. Books That Changed Me: You can't look at the world the same way again after reading some books. We discuss a few of the books that have impacted us, and shaped us politically?

3. "Tell em why you mad" Roundup

Third Rail Express: Calling out the New York Times

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We react to TV critic Alessandra Stanley's critique of Shonda Rhimes in last Sunday's New York Times. We call out the "newspaper of record" for allowing Stanley to mis-analyze and reduce Rhime's complex Black women heroines to "Angry Black Women" stereotypes.

Third Rail Eps 11: Street Talk

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Guest Hosts: 

Amaka Okechukwu, a member of BMC's collective, No Disrespect
Ruby-Beth Buitekant, a Crown Heights based youth organizer

Segments: 

1. ish- people-say-to-me: It's summer! Which means free concerts, trips to Coney Summer means street harassment season round these parts, and we are smack dab in the middle of it. What are the most outrageous things that have been said or done to you in the street, and what are some ways to react?
Media: ishpeoplesaytome.tumblr.com

2. The Block is Hot: It's one year after NYC social justice organizations got a huge success in the form of two City Council bills aimed at reforming aggressive policing policies. Has a difference in citywide policy translated to change at the precinct level? How's it goin' down in Central Brooklyn?

3. "Tell em why you mad" Roundup

Third Rail Eps 8: The Personal is Political

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Guest Hosts: 

Taja Lindley, Founder, Managing Member, Colored Girls Hustle
Jessica Valoris, Visual artist, Performing artist, and Poet

Segments: 

1. Colored Girl Hustle: Audre Lorde told us that "caring for [yourself] is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare.” But with so many attacks on our self-esteem, our families, and our communities, what does "self-preservation" look like for black women?

2. Can the "revolution" be fought online?: From #BringBackOurGirls to #WeCantBringBackOurDead. Who created them? What are the facts? And does anyone ever win the oppression olympics?

3. "Tell em why you mad" Roundup

Third Rail Eps 7: Laughing to Keep From Crying

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Guest Hosts: 
Lois Thompson, Producer, Comedian & Host, The Brown Girl Comedy Show
L. Michelle, Comedian, Actress, and Writer

Segments: 

1. Brown Girl Comedy: Every month the Brown Girl Comedy Show goes down in front of a packed house, so clearly there is an appetite for women of color comedians. But what are the struggles of brown girls trying to get play on stage? And how has Brooklyn been supportive of sisters trying to get a few laughs?

2. The 20th Anniversary of Crooklyn: This May marks 20 years since Crooklyn was released, and Bed-Stuy is in some ways unrecognizable. Could the things that happened in Crooklyn happen in Bed-Stuy today? How would the movie be different if filmed this year?

3. "Tell em why you mad" Roundup