Brooklyn Deep Third Rail

Third Rail Eps 48: Wakanda Forever: What Black Panther Promises Brooklyn & Black Cinema

00:0000:00

Raking in over $400 million in its opening weekend, Black Panther has broken almost all box office records. But what does that mean for Black Brooklynites, the media they make and the legacy we leave?  We discuss Marvel’s Black Panther with film and television producer, Okema T. Moore and Curtis Caesar John, Director of The Luminal Theater, a micro cinema specializing the curation of Black Film.

 Our engineer, Keisha “TK” Dutes, joins us as interim co-host alongside Mark Winston Griffith.

Segment One: Mark and TK talk to Okema and Curtis about the themes, feelings, and critiques that Black Panther brought up within the community. Also, find out the difference between the Black movie theater experience and the White movie theater experience.

Segment Two: Curtis John breaks down what makes a film a Black film; and we wonder how does this Black Panther’s success influences the future of Black film. Okema T. Moore schools us on some Black films and web series you should be in the know about.

Segment Three: "Tell 'Em Why You Mad"

 Episode Music:

  • Klaue/Wakanda Trailer, Black Panther 2018
  • “Warrior Falls” (Black Panther Score), Ludwig Goransson
  • “Pray For Me”, (Black Panther Soundtrack) The Weeknd & Kendrick Lamar
  • “Killmonger’s Challenge” (Black Panther Score), Ludwig Goransson

Intro and Outro theme Music:

“City Survival” by MC K-Swift featuring TreZure Empire.

 

Third Rail Eps 46.5: Weeksville Heritage Center: One on One

00:0000:00

In the second part of Brooklyn Deep’s exploration of historic Weeksville, Mark Winston Griffith sits down one-on-one with Rob Fields, the new President and Executive Director of the Weeksville Heritage Center. As a caretaker of Central Brooklyn’s past and a cultivator of its cultural present and future, Rob discusses the role of Weeksville Heritage Center in keeping Black Brooklyn resilient in the face of relentless gentrification.

Followed by a "Tell 'Em Why You Mad" moment from our very own, Veralyn Williams.

LINKS:

http://weeksvillesociety.org/

Music heard in this episode was found via The Lost Jazz Shrines of Weeksville project and include clips from: 

  • Horace Silver Quintet: "Cookin at The Continental"

Intro and Outro theme Music:

“City Survival” by MC K-Swift featuring TreZure Empire.

Third Rail Eps 46: Weeksville: The Past as Destiny

00:0000:00

Gentrification has many of us thinking, just how long does one of America’s largest Black Community have before it is disappeared? We discuss Weeksville, Brooklyn's first free Black Community with guests, Vivian Warfield whose family has a long Brooklyn lineage- and historian, Aimee VonBokel.

Segment One: Mark and Veralyn talk to Vivian about her commitment and descendancy to Weeksville, while Aimee provides historical context and geographical orientaion.  

Segment Two: The Brooklyn Deep team wonders: Did Weeksville leave us any clues on how to contend with the displacement of the very Black community it helped bring into existence?

Segment Three: "Tell 'Em Why You Mad"

LINKS: 

Aimee VonBokel provides us with a walk thru another family's economic timeline in Weeksville via the Carter-Mayo Properties

Music heard in this episode was found via The Lost Jazz Shrines of Weeksville project and include clips from: 

  • Horace Silver Quintet: "Cookin at The Continental"
  • Jim Europe's 369th Infantry "Hellfighters" Band "On Patrol In No Man's Land"
  • EUBIE BLAKE & THE NICHOLAS BROTHERS. Pie, Pie Blackbird. 1932 All-Black Musical Film.

Intro and Outro theme Music:

“City Survival” by MC K-Swift featuring TreZure Empire.

Third Rail Eps 36: Family Affair: Living a Bed-Stuy Gentrification Story

00:0000:00

This month we focus on 17-year-old Corinne Bobb-Semple’s reporting for the Radio Rookie series, not just as an act of journalism, but as something that springs from her family’s legacy of community entrepreneurship and civic action. We explore what it was like to discuss the intricacies of race, class and place in the Bobb-Semple home before, during and after Corinne shared her reporting and insights on gentrification in Central Brooklyn through the Rookies program.

Segment one: Family & Community
We discuss changes on Third Rail and introduce the Radio Rookies program. Our guests, Bed-Stuy residents- social entrepreneur Crystal Bobb-Semple and student Corrinne Bobb-Semple and tell us about the family and community experience that led to Corinne's piece for Radio Rookies.

Segment two: "Bed-Stuy the End of an Era"
We play Corinne Bobb-Semple’s piece about gentrification in Bedford-Stuyvesant. Co-produced by Brooklyn Deep and WNYC.

Segment 3: Can Black People gentrify?
We explore themes like Black versus White gentrifiers; what it means for the future Bed-Stuy and the Bobb- Semple family.
We discuss the process of creating the piece and what the types of responses it may elicit from people.

Segment 4: "Tell 'Em Why You Mad"
Is it sustainable for People of Color to create media, facilitate conversations, and be consumers?  Veralyn and Mark go head to head to discuss what about Corrine's story gets them mad.

TR Express: In moments like these

00:0000:00

We've been here before. Trying to process how easily black people die at the hands of police; how easily hashtags pile up: #DelrawnSmall #AltonSterling #PhilandoCastile; and needing to find a way forward through it all.

Third Rail pauses to check-in with Anthonine Pierre (Brooklyn Movement Center's Lead Community Organizer) and Ryann Holmes (Bklyn Boihood Co-founder) about the impact of this moment (which includes five Dallas officers being killed) and how Central Brooklyn moves forward.

If you need a community base or resource for an initiative you are taking on, contact the Brooklyn Movement Center at bmc@brooklynmovementcenter.org or Bklyn Boihood here.

Third Rail Eps 31: The Case for Hyper Local News

00:0000:00

On this episode, we unpack the role local news plays in neighborhoods like Bed-Stuy and Crown Heights and how outlets reporting in Central Brooklyn are cover gentrification.

Guest: Jarrett Murphy, Executive Editor & Publisher, City Limits

Segment 1: What role does hyperlocal news play in communities like Crown Heights and Bed-Stuy?
As much of what we knew of as metro reporting by legacy news outlets has faded in prominence over the last 10 years-- we want to know what role does hyperlocal news play in communities like Crown Heights and Bed-Stuy?

Segment 2: Reporting on the G word
It’s almost impossible to discuss hyper-local happenings without mentioning gentrification. But how is it currently being framed in mainstream media?


Segment 3: "Tell 'Em Why You Mad" 
Roundup

Third Rail Eps 30: What is the legacy of resilience in Central Brooklyn?

00:0000:00

On this episode we examine the legacy of resilience in Central Brooklyn by reflecting on the history of organizing and movement building here and then by asking what is the present state of the Movement for Black Lives here in Central Brooklyn, New York and nationwide.

Joining us for this discussion are two organizers who have played an important role in shaping the legacy of social and political self-determination that Black Brooklyn is known for today:

Lumumba Bandele, Senior Community Organizer, NAACP Legal Defense Fund

Ejeris Dixon, Founding Director, Vision Change Win


Segment 1: Histories Resilience in Central Brooklyn

While the fight for social change in Central Brooklyn has been city-wide and even national, it has often been anchored by what’s happening locally. We sit down with two organizers who have played a special role in shaping the legacy of social and political self-determination that Black Brooklyn is known for today.

Segment 2: How does Central Brooklyn connect to this movement moment?

In this present “movement moment” we ask: How has the legacy of Central Brooklyn organizing laid the groundwork for #BlackLivesMatter movements in Central Brooklyn, New York and nationwide?

Segment 3: "Tell 'Em Why You Mad" Roundup

Third Rail Eps 28: The Black Church, Circa 2016

00:0000:00

Walk down any street in Central Brooklyn and you're bound to find a church close by. Brooklyn is, after all, the “borough of churches.” But how relevant is the church in 2016? On the first Third Rail of the year, Onleilove Alston, Faith in New York's Executive Director, join us to break down the black church, circa 2016.

Segments:

1. What’s the connection between what’s going on inside Black churches and outside of them?

Historically, the Black church has been an institution at the forefront of social justice movements in our community. Is that still true today? How are Black churches responding to and interacting with organizing work taking place in 2015?

2. Borough of Churches: What's the plan?
In many traditional big churches in Central Brooklyn, you see aging populations and ministers struggling to fill the pews. In this segment, we ask what is the strategic plan to keep these churches self-sustained, relevant, and surviving?

3. "Tell em why you mad" Roundup

Third Rail Eps 25: The life and times of Brooklyn neighborhoods

00:0000:00

Assemblymember Diana Richardson and community advocate Marlon Peterson join us on Third Rail to look at the people and identities, influencing and claiming Central Brooklyn. We start by asking are elected officials and community organizers are on the same side of community development? Then we ask what neighborhood change means to immigrant communities?

Guests:

Assemblymember Diana Richardson, 43rd Assembly District
Marlon Petersons, Community Advocate & 2015 Soros Justice Fellow

Segments:

1. Are elected officials and community organizers on the same side of community development?

Economic development in Bed-Stuy and Crown Heights is an issue that calls to mind small business owners, big developers, and displaced longtime residents. On this episode, we’re exploring what perspectives elected officials and community organizers hold on the topic.

2. What does neighborhood change mean to immigrant communities?

Crown Heights has been built, over the last half century, as a largely Caribbean immigrant community. As we know, gentrification has taken hold as a different force of neighborhood change. We ask, what does gentrification look like from the perspective of first and second generation immigrants?

3. "Tell em why you mad" Roundup

Third Rail Local: Uncertin Fate of Bed-Stuy Community Gardens

00:0000:00

Brooklyn Deep reporter Cole Rosengren, join us to discuss his reporting on the fate of Central Brooklyn's community gardens under the city's current plan for "affordable" housing. 

Head to Brooklyn Deep to read his report in its entirety.